Port of Rotterdam focuses on shore power to achieve EU Green Deal ambition


In fact, the port explained that the reduction of emissions in the port is important, especially to improve the living environment in surrounding residential areas and to protect vulnerable Natura2000 areas in close proximity to the port.

At the moment, CO2-emissions at sea represent 87% of all emissions of logistics chains via Rotterdam. Hinterland transport is 11% and the emissions of berthed ships just 2%.

Therefore, the port believes that shore power has large socio-economic benefits to deliver, but is certainly not a “no regret” measure that works everywhere; for certain segments and port areas, other measures such as the use of low and zero emission fuels could be far more cost effective in terms of emission reduction.

Following the situation, Rotterdam’s port authority has set an ambitious strategy to realize 8 to 10 new shore power installations in the next five years.

In order to realize these ambitions, we need direct project subsidies to cover the non-profitable top of promising shore power projects. Putting a price on shipping emissions would considerably improve the business case for shore power while also boosting usage rates. Whereas a permanent tax exemption for shore power and zero emission fuels is needed to create a level playing field with tax exempted fossil fuels.

…as the port stated in a press release.

Currently, a variety of onshore power infrastructure projects are being executed in the port.

Namely, one of them concerns Europe’s largest green shore power connection to supply offshore crane vessels on the Calandkanaal with onshore wind power.

According to the port, this does not only result in significant carbon reductions, but also ensures that berthed vessels no longer emit nitrogen and particulate matter to the environment and moreover reduces noise levels.

Our ambition is to supply 90% of the ships visiting public quays in the urban area with shore power by
2030. Furthermore, we focus on areas and segments where we can take large steps forward. In order to realize these ambitions, we need direct project subsidies to cover the non-profitable top of promising shore power projects. Putting a price on shipping emissions would considerably improve the business case for shore power while also boosting usage rates.

..Rotterdam port concluded.



Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *