Baltic Exchange: Maritime market highlights 7-12 June


Tankers – VLCC

  • In the Middle East, rates for 270,000mt to China have bounced around WS60 level – up from last week’s WS57.5
  • Rates for 280,000mt to USG via cape/cape routing, meanwhile, have been assessed as steady at WS32.5.
  • In West Africa, a few fixtures have been concluded with rates remaining around WS59 for 260,000mt to China.

Tankers – Suezmax

  • Rates in this sector remain soft this week, with rates for 130,000mt Nigeria/UKCont falling four points to WS50 and facing further downward pressure.
  • The 135,000mt Black Sea/Med rates fell 10 points to WS50.
  • In the Middle East market, rates have remained flat at WS25.

Tankers – Aframax

  • Rates for 80,000mt Ceyhan/Med have remained flat at WS65.
  • In the North Sea the market has fallen further, with 80,000mt Cross North Sea now rated at WS70-72.5 level down from WS75 last week.
  • 100,000mt Baltic/UKC is now worth nearly 15 points less than a week ago, now WS42.5.
  • Across the Atlantic, rates for 70,000 Carib/USG climbed 11 points to WS72.

Tankers – Clean

  • The one area offering owners small crumbs of comfort was on the LR2s in the Middle East Gulf where rates for 75,000mt to Japan are now assessed over 15 points higher in the low WS90s.
  • In the 55,000mt trade to Japan, rates have fallen over 10 points to sit now at barely WS70, with charterers having plenty of choice.
  • The 30,000mt clean cross-Med trade came under renewed downward pressure. And, after starting the week in the low WS120s, now sits at close to WS105 level.

Bulk Carriers – Capesize

  • Earnings have lifted from sub operating cost levels under two weeks ago, to now having surged up to have the Capesize 5TC settling at $12,410.
  • Voyage route C3 now sits at $14.91 and the Brazil to China timecharter C14 posts at $13,936.
  • The West Australia to China C5 lifted from  $5.473 on Monday to close out this week at $6.486.

Bulk Carriers – Panamax

  • Levels for Australian and NoPac round trips this week hovered around the mid $7,000’s mark for Kamsarmax tonnage.
  • South America came to the fore with most of the grain houses placing tonnage for end June and July load arrivals – with the headline rate of $11,000 being agreed a few times for Kamsarmax tonnage delivery Singapore.
  • With FFA values gaining values over the week for both spot and further out months, some period activity this week included a Kamsarmax achieving $10,250 for one year’s employment.

Bulk Carriers – Supramax/ Ultramax

  • Period activity returned a 63,000-dwt open South Korea covering five to seven months trading redelivery worldwide at $11,000.
  • From the Indian Ocean activity levels remained strong. A 63,400-dwt open Mombasa covering a trip via South Africa redelivery Pakistan at $12,000 plus $200,000 ballast bonus.
  • For Pacific round voyage again better levels were seen, a 60,200-dwt fixing at $8,250 for a trip delivery Busan via north Pacific redelivery Chittagong.

Bulk Carriers – Handysize

  • A 36,000-dwt was fixed from south Brazil for a trip to ARAG range at $7,500 early in the week, and later a 37,000-dwt open in the same area was fixed in the $7,000s for a trip to the Baltic.
  • In the Pacific, rates remained firm with cargoes in the Far East building up. A 28,000 open south Vietnam was fixed for a trip via east coast India to China at $5,000.
  • Mid-sized vessels delivery in Australia were fixed at $8,750 for a trip to Southeast Asia and $9,000 for a trip to China.

The full reports are available on Baltic Exchange’s website, under related category. Namely, the Baltic Exchange information is based on assessments made by a global panel of shipbrokers, covering voyage and timecharter rates for capesize, panamax, supramax and handysize bulk carriers; VLCC, aframax & MR tankers, LPG and LNG vessels as well as  forward assessments, vessel values, market reports & fixtures and demolition values.

See also 

Batlic Exchange: Maritime market highlights 29 May – 5 June

Batlic Exchange: Maritime market highlights 24-29 May



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