Drogheda Port Offers New Brexit Shipping Solution on the Irish Sea


In partnership with Fast Lines Belgium, a new service has already commenced “BEL – EIRE LINES”. In partnership with Fast Lines Belgium, a new service has already commenced “BEL – EIRE LINES”.

Drogheda Port Company is getting ready for Brexit. As one of Ireland’s leading break bulk ports, Drogheda is announcing two new breakbulk shortsea services as part of a solution for importers and exporters concerned with the impacts of Brexit.

In partnership with Fast Lines Belgium, a new service has already commenced “BEL – EIRE LINES”. Bel-Eire Lines is a conventional breakbulk Liner Service connecting the port of Antwerp to the port of Drogheda, shipping goods from an EU port to an EU port. The service will reroute the cargo flows of existing and new customers shipping directly in or out of Ireland avoiding the UK.

The service caters for:

• all types of breakbulk such as steel products, bagged material, palletized goods
• cargoes currently trucked via UK land-bridge to Ireland
• smaller lots difficult to ship as full and complete cargoes
• project cargo
• trans-shipment cargo

The service is operated with Fast Lines Belgium’s box-shaped short-sea vessel fleet.

A second new service will commence in December linking the port of Nogaro in Italy with the port of Drogheda. This service will also offer a full suite break bulk service linking into the central European rail network.

Mr Paul Fleming Port CEO said, “We are delighted to welcome these new services which will strengthen the strategic importance of Drogheda Port in supporting the Irish Construction Sector and provide a seamless supply chain from Europe to Ireland in a post Brexit trading environment.”

Mr Simon Mulvany MD Fast Lines Ireland said “We are always looking for new growth opportunities and as experts in shipping goods in and out of Ireland to the continent these new services will form part of Irelands solution for Brexit. We will be providing an opportunity for existing and new customers to reroute their cargo flows in or out of Ireland.”
Source: Afloat



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